Cellulosic

Cellulosic fibres have been used for centuries and are the most environmentally friendly fibres because they do not require a chemical process to turn them into fabric. Cellulosic fabrics come from plants or trees, in particular the stems, seeds, or bark, which is cleaned, separated, and then spun into fibre. Examples of cellulosic fabrics we use at Cotswold Collections are cotton and linen.

Linen

Linen

Linen, which comes from the flax plant, is even more ancient than cotton, and possibly the oldest textile on earth with examples being found which could date back over 30,000 years. It was grown in Great Britain from around 900 BC until the second world war, with Northern Ireland still growing linen until 2009. Flax grows very well and does not require too much care and can produce two very different product: stalks are used for linen and the seeds, known as flaxseeds or linseeds, used for food or oil. Linen is a summer-time favourite due to its breathability, moisture-wicking and cool comfort. It is also often blended with viscose for a softer handfeel and more premium feeling product.

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Cotton

Cotton

The history of cotton can be traced back to 4500 BC in South America, and is prized for its breathability, comfort, and low maintenance. Although cotton is naturally occurring and does not require chemicals to transform the plant into a fibre, it is a very thirsty plant with a single cotton plant requiring around 10 gallons of water; this means cotton farmers need to use irrigation techniques to ensure resources are protected.

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